Archive for the 'investigatory powers' Category

BT and Phorm escape prosecution for secret wiretaps – Daily Telegraph

“BT and Phorm will not face prosecution for trials of technology that secretly intercepted and profiled the broadband traffic of tens of thousands of people, the Crown Prosecution Service has announced.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 8th April 2011

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

News International could face prosecution – The Guardian

“News International as a corporation could face a criminal prosecution following its admission that the phones of celebrities were hacked into by its staff.”

Full story

The Guardian, 8th April 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

New code to govern CCTV cameras – The Independent

“Police forces and councils who want to set up CCTV systems will have to be open and clear about what they will be used for and why under Home Office plans.”

Full story

The Independent, 1st March 2011

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Freedom Bill signals common sense approach to public protection – Home Office

“Millions of people will be protected from unwarranted state intrusion in their private lives, the Home Secretary has outlined in today’s Protection of Freedoms Bill.”

Full press release

Home Office, 11th February 2011

www.homeoffice.gov.uk

People get power to take CCTV abusers to court – Daily Telegraph

“Any member of the public will be able to refer a local authority for judicial review if they can argue their cameras were set up or are being used inappropriately.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 10th February 2011

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Surveillance society soon a reality, report suggests – The Guardian

“Information commissioner Christopher Graham is pressing ministers for new privacy safeguards in the wake of a report that suggests moves towards a surveillance society are expanding and intensifying.”

Full story

The Guardian, 11th November 2010

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

West Midlands police facing judicial review over surveillance project – The Guardian

“The West Midlands police force faces a judicial review over its plans to continue using cameras installed under a discredited scheme to place thousands of Muslims under permanent surveillance.”

Full story

The Guardian, 18th October 2010

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Police lied to persuade CCTV staff to monitor drink-drive suspects – The Guardian

“Police were criticised today for inventing intelligence to persuade civilian CCTV operators to snoop on suspected drink-drivers outside pubs.”

Full story

The Guardian, 6th October 2010

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Police surveillance of Muslims set up with ‘no regard for law’ – The Guardian

“A secret police operation to place thousands of Muslims living in Birmingham under permanent surveillance was implemented with virtually no consultation, oversight or regard for the law, a report found today.”

Full story

The Guardian, 30th September 2010

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Family win school catchment spying case – The Guardian

“A family won a landmark ruling today when a council was found to have acted illegally in spying on them for nearly three weeks to discover whether they had lied about living in the catchment area of a top primary school.”

Full story

The Guardian, 2nd August 2010

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Emails and phones snooped on by authorities every minute – Daily Telegraph

“Public authorities asked for confidential communications data on more than 525,000 occasions last year including a 13 per cent increase in requests by town halls.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 28th July 2010

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Fears over new EU snooping powers for police – Daily Telegraph

“The proposed power would allow officers from an EU country to demand information on anyone they suspect of an offence, no matter how minor or whether it is even criminal in the UK.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 16th July 2010

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Government begins RIPA review – OUT-LAW.com

“The Government will review the use of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA), the law that governs state tapping of phone, email and internet use. The law will be looked at as part of a wider review of counter-terrorism laws.”

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 14th July 2010

Source: www.out-law.com

Rapid review of counter-terrorism powers – Home Office

“The Home Secretary has announced today that a rapid review of key counter-terrorism and security powers is underway. The review will look at what counter-terrorism powers and measures could be rolled back in order to restore the balance of civil liberties and counter-terrorism powers.”

Full press release

Home Office, 13th July 2010

Source: www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Counter-terrorism powers to face government review – BBC News

“The government is to review key counter-terrorism and security powers including the 28-day limit on detaining terrorist suspects without charge.”

Full story

BBC News, 13th July 2010

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Councils using anti-terror laws to spy on dog walkers – Daily Telegraph

“Councils spied on dog walkers suspected of not clearing up after their pets in a string of abuses of their covert surveillance rights, a report published today said.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 24th May 2010

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

UK’s secret surveillance regime does not breach human rights, rules ECHR – OUT-LAW.com

“The European Court of Human Rights has rejected a claim that the UK’s Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) violates the human right to a private life. The UK’s rules and safeguards on covert surveillance are proportionate, said the court.”

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 19th May 2010

Source: www.out-law.com

“Eye in the sky” arrest of a teenage thief could land police in court – Daily Telegraph

“An ‘eye in the sky’ arrest of a teenager fleeing from a stolen car using a surveillance drone could land police in court after it emerged it did not have permission to be in the air.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 16th February 2010

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Judges examine rise in complaints against MI5 – The Independent

“A record rise in the number of complaints against MI5 and other bodies authorised to spy on the public is being investigated by judges appointed to oversee the use of surveillance powers in Britain.”

Full story

The Independent, 6th January 2010

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Former MI5 man loses supreme court case in memoirs fight – The Guardian

“Judges rule battle to publish book must be pursued in secretive investigatory powers tribunal.”

Full story

The Guardian, 9th December 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

R (A) v Director of Establishments of the Security Service – WLR Daily

R (A) v Director of Establishments of the Security Service [2009] UKSC 12; [2009] WLR (D) 356

“Jurisdiction to hear a claim against the intelligence services for a violation of the right to freedom of expression guaranteed by art 10 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was granted exclusively to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”) by s 65(2)(a) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000. Therefore the High Court had no jurisdiction to hear an application for judicial review brought by a former member of the Security Service in respect of a refusal of permission to publish a book about his work with the service.”

WLR Daily, 9th December 2009

Source; www.lawreports.co.uk

Please note once a case has been fully reported in one of the ICLR series the corresponding WLR Daily summary is removed.

Legislation to access public’s texts and emails put on hold – The Guardian

“Legislation for a £2bn Home Office surveillance project to track details of everybody’s email, mobile phone, text and internet use has been put on hold after a consultation raised concerns over its technical feasibility, costs and privacy safeguards.”

Full story

The Guardian, 9th November 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

New measures to strengthen the use of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act – Home Office

“The level of authorisation required by local authorities to sign off investigatory techniques will be raised to prevent them being used for trivial matters.”

Full press release

Home Office, 4th November 2009

Source: www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Woman in ‘spy’ council tribunal – BBC News

“A woman who says she was spied on by her local authority to find out whether she lived in the catchment area of a school is starting a legal challenge.”

Full story

BBC News, 5th November 2009

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Child support investigators get new spying powers – Daily Telegraph

“The agency responsible for tracing absent parents is to be given access to phone and email records for the first time, under Home Office rules.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 4th November 2009

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Alan Johnson announces plans to curb excessive council surveillance – The Times

“Councils are to have their powers to snoop on the public curbed under government plans aimed at addressing alarm at the expansion of the surveillance state.”

Full story

The Times, 4th November 2009

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Arms protester on police spotter card was alleged infiltrator for BAE – The Guardian

“The 2005 spotter card, published by the Guardian this week, contains a photograph of Martin Hogbin, who was national co-ordinator for the Campaign against the Arms Trade. He was later accused of supplying information to a company linked to BAE’s security department, but denied the allegation.”

Full story

The Guardian, 27th October 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Spy v spy at new supreme court as MI5 secrecy is put to the test – The Guardian

“It may not have the ring of a historic legal battle. But the case of A v B, which opened at the new supreme court today, has a significance that goes way beyond the banal soubriquets of the two sides.”

Full story

The Guardian, 20th October 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Big Brother culture attacked by country’s top barrister – Daily Telegraph

“The ‘Big Brother’ culture is on the march across Britain, allowing the state to snoop on phone calls, emails and even walking the dog, the country’s top barrister, Desmond Browne QC, has warned.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 8th October 2009

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

A request to snoop on public every 60 secs – Daily Telegraph

“Councils, police and other public bodies are seeking access to people’s private telephone and email records almost 1,400 times a day, new figures have disclosed.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 9th August 2009

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Why must a secret service fair hearing be heard in secret? – The Times

“Former MI5 officers guard many secrets. But, as Dame Stella Rimington well knows, they can tell their own stories. A former agent has to seek prior approval for publication from his or her former employers and, if it is not given, any dispute will ultimately be adjudicated by a High Court Judge with all the usual safeguards to ensure a fair trial. Or so it was thought until the Court of Appeal gave judgment in A v B.”

Full story

The Times, 11th June 2009

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Council uses terror law to spy on shirker in shower – The Times

“A local council has used surveillance powers designed to catch terrorists and prevent serious crime to check how long a member of staff spent in the shower.”

Full story

The Times, 24th May 2009

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Giant database plan to be set out – BBC News

“Plans to track all e-mails sent, all phone calls made and all internet pages visited in the UK are to be unveiled by Home Secretary Jacqui Smith.”

Full story

BBC News, 27th April 2009

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Ex-defence chief says attack on liberties is bowing to terrorists – The Guardian

“A former chief of the defence staff has warned that the ‘creeping irreversible curtailment’ of civil liberties in the name of national security is ‘playing the game by terrorists’ rules’.

Full story

The Guardian, 24th April 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

The anti-terror law used on litterbugs – BBC News

“Home Secretary Jacqui Smith is to clamp down on local councils who use anti-terror laws to catch litterbugs and other minor offenders.”

Full story

BBC News, 17th April 2009

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Home Secretary outlines review of Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act

“Plans to stop investigatory powers being used for trivial purposes were announced by the Home Secretary today (17 April).”

Full story

Home Office, 17th April 2009

Source: www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Ministers to review councils’ use of anti-terrorism surveillance powers – The Guardian

“The government tried yesterday to quell rising concern over the abuse of powers designed to fight terrorism and serious crime, which some councils were using to target people who put their bins out on the wrong day.”

Full story

The Guardian, 17th April 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Regina (A) v Director of Establishments of the Security Service – Times Law Reports

Regina (A) v Director of Establishments of the Security Service

Court of Appeal

“The Administrative Court did not have jurisdiction to entertain a claim that a public authority proposed to act in a way incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights where the matters brought up were within the purview of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal.”

The Times, 6th April 2009

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

MEPs urge governments to produce surveillance register – OUT-LAW.com

“Governments should create a list of all organisations that track internet use and produce an annual report on internet surveillance, the European Parliament has said.”

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 2nd April 2009

Source: www.out-law.com

Extent of council spying revealed – BBC News

“Councils in England and Wales have used controversial spying laws 10,000 times in the past five years, figures obtained by the Liberal Democrats show.”

Full story

BBC News, 26th March 2009

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Lawyer-client privilege can’t stop surveillance, says House of Lords – OUT-LAW.com

“The state is allowed to bug communication between lawyers and their clients, the House of Lords has said. The UK’s highest court ruled that spy law the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) allows lawyers’ conversations to be bugged.”

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 23rd March 2009

Source: www.out-law.com

McE v Prison Service of Northern Ireland; C and A v Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland; M v Same – WLR Daily

McE v Prison Service of Northern Ireland; C and A v Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland; M v Same [2009] UKHL 15; [2009] WLR(D) 90

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (‘RIPA’) permitted covert surveillance of communications between lawyers and their clients covered by legal professional privilege and notwithstanding any statutory rights of persons in custody to consult privately with their lawyers.”

WLR Daily, 12th March 2009

Source: www.lawreports.co.uk

Please note once a case has been fully reported in one of the ICLR series the corresponding WLR Daily summary is removed.

McE v Prison Service of Northern Ireland and Another; C and A v Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland; M v Same – Times Law Reports

McE v Prison Service of Northern Ireland and Another; C and A v Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland; M v Same

House of Lords

“Covert surveillance of communications between lawyers and their clients, covered by legal professional privilege, was permitted under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, notwithstanding any statutory rights of persons in custody to consult their lawyers in private.”

The Times, 12th March 2009

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Please note the Times Law Reports are only available free on Times Online for 21 days from the date of publication.

R (A) v Director of Establishments of the Security Service – WLR Daily

R (A) v Director of Establishments of the Security Service [2009] EWCA Civ 24; [2009] WLR (D) 63

The Administrative Court did not have jurisdiction to entertain a claim that a public authority proposed to act in a way incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights where the matters brought up were within the purview of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal.”

WLR Daily, 19th February 2009

Source: www.lawreports.co.uk

Please note once a case has been reported in one of the ICLR series the corresponding WLR Daily summary is removed.

Comment is Free: Judges possess the weapon to challenge surveillance – The Guardian

“The British are the most spied upon people in the democratic world, but only the judiciary can restrain parliament.”

Full story

The Guardian, 17th February 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Surveillance needs better control, warn Lords – OUT-LAW.com

“The fundamental relationship between Government and the people of the UK is at risk because of the increasing surveillance being carried out by the state and by private bodies, a House of Lords Committee has said.”

Full story

OUT-LAW, 10th February 2009

Source: www.out-law.com

Superdatabase tracking all calls and emails legitimate, says DPP – The Guardian

“Controversial plans for a ‘super­database’ tracking all phone and internet communications today received the tacit support of the new director of public prosecutions (DPP).”

Full story

The Guardian, 9th January 2009

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Police ‘encouraged’ to hack more – BBC News

“The Home Office has signed up to an EU strategy against cybercrime that ‘encourages’ police across Europe to remotely access personal computers.”

Full story

BBC News, 5th January 2009

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

New powers for police to hack your PC – The Independent

“Police have been given the power to hack into personal computers without a court warrant. The Home Office is facing anger and the threat of a legal challenge after granting permission. Ministers are also drawing up plans to allow police across the EU to collect information from computers in Britain.”

Full story

The Independent, 5th January 2009

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Common sense approaches to dealing with crime and DNA – Home Office

“In a speech, Home Secretary Jacqui Smith called for new ‘common sense standards’ for the use of investigatory powers and the retention of DNA profiles.”

Full press release

Home Office, 16th December 2008

Source: www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Town halls banned from using spy laws for petty offences – Daily Telegraph

“Town halls are to be banned from using anti-terror laws to spy on the public for petty offences, the Home Secretary is due to announce.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 16th December 2008

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Social services ‘set up CCTV camera in couple’s bedroom’ – Daily Telegraph

“Council staff are said to have spied on the young parents at night as part of a plan to see if they were fit to look after their baby, who was sleeping in another room. The mother and father were forced to cite the Human Rights Act, which protects the right to a private life, before the social services team backed down and agreed to switch off the surveillance camera while they were in bed together. The case is highlighted in a new dossier of human rights abuses carried out against vulnerable and elderly adults in nursing homes and hospitals across Britain.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 24th November 2008

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

‘Big Brother’ database plan shelved – The Independent

“The timetable for setting up a giant ‘Big Brother’ database is slipping after the scheme was dropped from next month’s Queen’s Speech. The Independent has highlighted growing fury over government moves to collate details of every telephone call, email and internet visit.”

Full story

The Independent, 21st November 2008

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Data retention laws: what they mean for ISPs – OUT-LAW.com

“This guide is based on UK law. It was last updated in October 2008.”

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 11th November 2008

Source: www.out-law.com

Half of councils use anti-terror laws to spy on ‘bin crimes’ – Daily Telegraph

“More than half of councils are using anti-terror laws to spy on families suspected of ‘bin crimes’, it has emerged.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 1st November 2008

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk


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